2018 Rosé de Grenache by the bottle

$22.50

A beautifully pale Rosé made in the classic Provençal style from the Mathis Vineyard. With extremely low phenolics, pale salmon color, fresh acidity and delicate bouquet of red fruits and a hint of anise herbality, the fruit is harvested in very early morning to ensure low temperatures (and less extraction) and is delivered whole cluster to the press. Only the first 75% of the yield is used in the production of the wine, as the later press fractions have to much tannin.  

 

TASTING NOTES

With a silky mouthfeel, this rosé is the perfect summer sipper to go easily with all types of food, particularly summer grilling fare, spicy Asian dishes, or a variety of soft cheeses such as a chevre.

PRODUCTION NOTES

VINTAGE: 2018 
APPELLATION: Sonoma Valley
VARIETAL(S): 100% Grenache
VINEYARD: Mathis Vineyard
HARVEST: September 9 and 15, 2018
AGING: 4 Months in Stainless Steel
ALCOHOL: 13.2%
CASES: 820 
pH: 3.3
TITRATABLE ACIDITY: 5.8 grams/liter
RESIDUAL SUGAR: 2.0 grams/liter, or 0.2% (dry)

VINEYARD DESCRIPTION

Peter Mathis with glass of Mathis Rose de GrenacheThe 2018 Rosé de Grenache is made from my vineyard in the hills above the town of Sonoma, with the fruit for this wine coming from the 700 and 800 blocks of Grenache. Planted in 1999, these blocks are mixed with clone 513 and 515 and are field grafted to St. George rootstock.

FERMENTATION NOTES

Delivered whole cluster (without crushing) directly to press. This traditional Rosé method coupled with a slow, cold fermentation allowed for delicate coloration and exquisite fruit expression. 100% native yeast.

BOTTLING DATE

March 26, 2019

HARVEST NOTES

Another year of good spring rains got the Grenache vines off to a good growth spurt. The same rains also contributed to lowered fruit set and subsequent lowered yields, leading to excellent concentration. Lengthy hot spells in mid summer sped up ripening and I had to hurry to get the rosé grapes picked before the became over mature. The Rosé blocks were picked pre-dawn when the fruit is at its coolest, helping lower phenolic extraction when handling at the winery.